University of Michigan Institute for Social Research 2012 Fellowships

The University of Michigan Institute for Social Research (ISR) recently awarded more than $250,000 in fellowships to 42 graduate students and researchers in its quest to support young scholars and innovative social science research.

 

Traci Kennedy (Photo by Eva Menezes)

Traci Kennedy (Photo by Eva Menezes)

The Robert Kahn Fellowship for the Scientific Study of Social Issues was awarded to Traci Kennedy, a doctoral candidate in the U-M Department of Psychology. Kennedy aims to identify and understand characteristics of community violence and of those exposed to it that produce different mental health outcomes among youth, particularly Latino youth.

 
 

Ryan Bremner (Photo by D.C. Goings)

Ryan Bremner (Photo by D.C. Goings)

The Daniel Katz Dissertation Fellowship in Psychology was awarded to Ryan Bremner, a doctoral candidate in the U-M Department of Psychology. Bremner is examining the role of self-distancing—gaining psychological distance from one’s thoughts or desires—in addressing biased thinking and emotional disorders.

 

 

Natalie Sabik (Photo by Eva Menezes)

Natalie Sabik (Photo by Eva Menezes)

The Elizabeth Douvan Junior Scholars Award in Life Course Development was awarded to Natalie Sabik, a doctoral candidate in the U-M Department of Psychology. Sabik is researching the relationship between body image and psychological well-being among older African-American and European-American women.

 

 

Christoph Nolte (Photo by Eva Menezes)

Christoph Nolte (Photo by Eva Menezes)

The Marshall Weinberg Population, Development, and Climate Change Fellowship was awarded to Christoph Nolte, a doctoral candidate in the U-M School of Natural Resources and Environment. Nolte is studying the economic tradeoffs of land conservation efforts in Brazil. (Read an article and watch a video about his research.)

 

 

Sarah Mills (Photo by Eva Menezes)

Sarah Mills (Photo by Eva Menezes)

The Robert and Judy Marans/Kan and Lillian Chen Fellowship in Sustainability and Survey Methodology was awarded to Sarah Mills, a doctoral candidate in U-M’s A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning. Mills is researching the role rural communities might play in curbing urban sprawl and creating sustainable development patterns. (Read an article and watch a video about her research.)

 

Michael Gideon (Photo by Eva Menezes)

Michael Gideon (Photo by Eva Menezes)

The F. Thomas Juster Economics Behavior Research Award was given to Michael Gideon, a doctoral candidate in the U-M Department of Economics. Gideon is investigating the degree of rounding in self-reported wealth.

 

 

 

Gayle Alberda (Photo by Eva Menezes)

Gayle Alberda (Photo by Eva Menezes)

The Warren E. Miller Scholarship was awarded to Gayle Alberda, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Political Science at Wayne State University.  Alberda is studying the impact of structural and institutional contexts on political participation and choice in low-information elections. In addition, Warren E. Miller Fellowships were awarded to Kyeonghi Baek, an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Buffalo State College, and Jill Carle, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Political Science at Arizona State University. Baek is interested in the interaction between international relations and domestic political participation and electoral processes. Carle is studying the effects of media coverage on how citizens evaluate candidates in primary elections.

Jill Carle (Photo by Eva Menezes)

Jill Carle (Photo by Eva Menezes)

Kyeonghi Baek (Photo by Eva Menezes)

Kyeonghi Baek (Photo by Eva Menezes)

 

The Charles Cannell Fund in Survey Methodology granted awards to Dana Garbarski, who will receive her Ph.D. in Sociology and an M.S. in Population Health Sciences from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in August; and to Julie Korbmacher and Ulrich Krieger, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy. Garbarski is studying the interaction between interviewers and respondents regarding end-of-life treatment preferences and that of their spouses in order to better understand how both interviewers and respondents deal with sensitive or threatening topics. Korbmacher and Krieger are examining interviewer influence on cooperation rates and survey quality in the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe.

The Roy Pierce Scholars Fund supported research by two teams of researchers affiliated with the U-M Department of Political Science and ISR’s Center for Political Studies. Vanessa Cruz, Brian Min, and Jowei Chen are investigating the effectiveness of family and panethnic group appeals in mobilizing Latino voters. Laura Seago and Jana von Stein are looking at when and why human rights non-governmental organizations target companies rather than governments.

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