November 2015

David Weir was quoted by The Denver Post Online in “Segment of middle-aged whites in U.S. are dying at startling rate”.

The Washington Post cited David Weir in “A group of middle-aged whites in the U.S. is dying at a startling rate”.

David Weir was quoted by 10 publications, including the Chicago Tribune Online, in “One group of middle-aged whites in the U.S. is dying at a startling rate”.

Terri Orbuch was quoted by Chicago Tribune Online in “In-law bylaws: Keys to becoming a great mother- and father-in-law”.

Miles Kimball was cited by Business Insider in “This is how a central bank could kill of cash and bring in negative interest rates on your savings”.

Taipei Times quoted Mary Gallagher in “US welcomes meeting, despite reservations”.

ETtoday quoted Mary Gallagher in “U.S. scholars said Ma should be cautious about meeting with Xi”.

The Institute for Social Research was cited 91 times, including by CBS News Online in “Adults over 30 may be losing the ‘happiness advantage’”.

Mary Gallagher was quoted by Associated Press in “Historic meet realizes hopes for Taiwan, China”.

TIME cited the Institute for Social Research in “Being an Introvert Can Make You Rich”.

Business Insider quoted Michael Traugott in “Here’s why polls might be ‘ruining democracy’”.

TIME mentioned Richard Nisbett in “9 Books That Everyone Should Read, According to Malcolm Gladwell”.

Terri Orbuch was quoted by seven publications, including The Sacramento Bee Online in “In-law bylaws: Keys to becoming a great mother- or father-in-law”.

Youth Today Online cited the Institute for Social Research in “Prevention is Key”.

The Institute for Social Research was cited by MetroWest Daily News Online in “Drug abuse expert to speak on marijuana at Concord-Carlisle High”.

William Axinn was cited by MLive in “Sexual assault ‘no big deal’ survey response baffles those addressing it on Michigan campuses”.

Miles Kimball was quoted by MSNBC in “Fed’s pace is big unknown”.

Arthur Lupia was quoted by Inside Higher Ed in “Political scientists seek delay of transparency standards for publications”.

Business Insider quoted Michael Traugott in “’I’m pretty worried’ about the state of polling”.

Miles Kimball was cited by Chicago Tribune in “Japan is locked in a struggle to spark inflation”.

Bloomberg News cited Miles Kimball in “Japan’s Endless Struggle to Spark Inflation”.

Luke Shaefer was cited by The Huffington Post in “Let’s Make Black Friday Thankful Friday”.

NBC Television Network quoted Arthur Lupia in “The presidential candidate you’d most want to have a drink with is…

The Institute for Social Research was cited by five publications, including the East Valley Tribune Online in “College football coaches grapple with marijuana ‘epidemic’”.

The Institute for Social Research was cited by The Wall Street Journal in “The Doctor the NFL Tried to Silence”.

Daniel Kruger was quoted by MSN in “The Science Behind Why We Love Celebrity Gossip So Much”.

William H. Frey was quoted by The New York Times in “Marco Rubio Bets the Grand Old Party Is Ready for His Younger Face”.

The New York Times mentioned Arthur Lupia in “Polls Can Give People a Stronger Voice”.

October 2015

The Institute for Social Research was mentioned by six publications, including The Fiscal Times in “Obamacare not spurring more early retirements yet despite predictions”.

The Economist cited Gerald Davis in “Capitalism and its discontents”.

U.S. News & World Report quoted Michael Traugott in “McCarthy’s Benghazi Gaffe Won’t Sink His Speaker Chances”.

TIME mentioned the Institute for Social Research in “Calling Your Grandma Doesn’t Cut It”.

The Institute for Social Research was cited by five publications, including The Sacramento Bee Online in “Some e-cig smokers are vaping active ingredient in marijuana”.

The Institute for Social Research was cited by five publications, including the Detroit News Online in “Study: E-cigs draw young smokers to regular cigarettes”.

The Globe and Mail mentioned the Institute for Social Research in “Why it’s time to put your smartphone down”.

Wayne Baker was quoted by The Huffington Post in “Why You Can Thank Mom and Dad for Your Work Ethic”.

Terri Orbuch was quoted by Detroit Free Press in “How one woman found her place in life”.

FOX Business Network cited the Institute for Social Research in “This Latest Study Suggest That Marijuana May Be in a No-Win Situation”.

The Institute for Social Research was cited by MLive in “Exploring the public health consequences of Detroit’s water shutoffs”.

Metro Parent – Online cited the Institute for Social Research in “Drug Guide: Definitions and Effects of Popular Types”.

The Institute for Social Research was cited by four publications, including the Orlando Sentinel Online, in “College football coaches grapple with ‘marijuana epidemic’”.

The Institute for Social Research was cited by Canton Citizen – Online in “Man About Canton: Don Rodman”.

KQED-FM Online quoted Deborah Loewenberg Ball in “What Core Skills Do Teachers Need To Be Effective?”

NPR quoted Michael Traugott in “Canada’s 11-Week Campaign Reminds Us That American Elections Are Much Longer”.

Miles Kimball was quoted by Fortune in “Ben Bernanke sees the upside of negative rates”.

Yahoo News cited the Institute for Social Research in “The Drug Burning Up College Campuses”.

The Washington Post published an article by Arthur Lupia and colleagues titled “What the Canadian and British election polls tell us about Donald Trump”.

Washington Times Online cited the Institute for Social Research in “Marijuana use among adults doubled in a decade: study”.

Deborah Ball was quoted by twelve publications, including WNIJ-FM Online in “Teaching Teachers To Teach: It’s Not So Elementary”.

Bloomberg Businessweek quoted Richard Curtin in “America’s Well-Off Show An Aversion to Debt”.

Forbes cited Vicki Freedman in “The Challenges of Caring For A Loved One With Dementia”.

MLive cited the Institute for Social Research in “Teens prescribed opioids more likely to abuse drugs as adults”.

The New York Times cited Reynolds Farley in “Has ‘Diversity’ Lost Its Meaning?”

Richard Miech was cited by Psychiatry Advisor in “Legitimate Use of Opioids By Teens Can Lead to Abuse”.

The Detroit News cited Deborah Ball in “Labor Voices: Kiss love affair with tests goodbye”.

U.S. News & World Report cited the Institute for Social Research in “Marriage May Aid Recovery From Heart Surgery”.

The Washington Post cited Reynolds Farley in “Why visibility isn’t the same as diversity when it comes to characters on TV”.

Al Jazeera America cited Abigail Weitzman in “End of one-child policy won’t end bias against girls in China”.

Luke Shaefer was cited by The Washington Post in “Take a hard look at what it means to be poor in America, and ask how to help”.

The Wall Street Journal cited the Institute for Social Research in “China’s Bid to Alter Demographic Trend Will Be Tough”.

Deborah Ball was cited by the Detroit Free Press in “Education in Michigan can improve, if it’s done right”.

September 2015

Lloyd Johnston was mentioned by 69 outlets, including The Seattle Times in “Study: Pot more a habit for college students than cigarettes.”

CBS News quoted Luke Shaefer in “The surging ranks of America’s ultrapoor.”

The Institute for Social Research was mentioned by WINS-AM in a radio broadcast on 9/1/2015.

WBBM-AM mentioned the Institute for Social Research in a radio broadcast on 9/1/2015.

Helen Levy and Thomas Buchmueller were mentioned by Next Avenue in “The Obamacare Surprise About Retirement.”

The Institute for Social Research was cited by KABC-AM in two radio broadcasts on 9/2/2015.

The New York Times quoted H. Luke Shaefer in “‘$2.00 a Day,’ by Kathryn J. Edin and H. Luke Shaefer.”

Richard Nesbitt was interviewed by The Globe and Mail in “Thinking critically about your investments.”

Richard Nesbitt wrote an op-ed published in The Los Angeles Times: “Do you think like an economist?

Reuters cited the Health and Retirement Study in “Why planning to work in retirement is a risky business.”

HeraldNet mentioned Sara Konrath in “Reading about the Wright brothers offers a lesson in empathy.”

Reuben Jonathan Miller was mentioned by two outlets, including Wired, in “How Inmates and Loved Ones Review Jails on Yelp.”

MarketWatch mentioned Christopher House in “Greece will likely remain in intensive care for years without more help.”

Jon Miller was mentioned by NPR in “Scientific Literacy: It’s Not (Just) About the Facts.”

The Detroit Free Press mentioned Michael Traugott in “Republican candidates head to Michigan island.”

Michael Traugott was quoted by U.S. News & World Report in “The Problem with Polls.”

The Week quoted Frederick Conrad in “The rising revolt against customer surveys.”

August 2015

CBS MoneyWatch cited the Health and Retirement Study in “Will retirement make you happier?

Fourteen outlets, including Detroit Free Press, mentioned Vincent Hutchings in “Rubio, Bush face different challenges in first GOP debate.”

Sara Konrath was mentioned by 26 outlets, including the Chicago Tribune, in “Be generous: It’s a simple way to stay healthier.”

Fourteen outlets, including Dallas News, mentioned Elizabeth Armstrong in “Heather Wilhelm: Vanity Fair’s Tinder piece shows how feminism sold women out.”

Sonja Starr was mentioned by BET in “Report: Most Prosecutors Are White, as a Result Blacks Face Harsher Sentences.”

Two outlets, including credit.com, cited the Panel Survey of Income Dynamics in “Today’s First-Time Homebuyer is 32 & More Likely to be Single.”

Ethan Kross was quoted in three outlets, including abc11.com, in “Is social media bumming you out about summer? Here’s how to beat the FOMO blues.”

CBS MoneyWatch cited the Health and Retirement Study in “For many, ‘retirement’ means getting a job.”

The Panel Survey of Income Dynamics was cited by UW Today in “Study: Mixed-race couples with black partners more likely to live in poor neighborhoods.”

Stephen Garcia was mentioned by The Atlantic in “Why Break a World Record?

Two outlets, including WNYC-AM, mentioned Jon Miller in “Pop Quiz: How Science-Literate Are We, Really?

June 2015

Richard Allen Miech was mentioned by The Daily Mail in “Revealed: Why you should WEIGHT before you marry! Couples who wed before they have graduated from college are more likely to become obese.”

Bridge featured Deborah Loewenberg Ball in “Ball Q&A: Michigan kids ‘will lose’ with weak teacher evaluation bill.”

James S. Jackson was mentioned by five outlets, including New America Media in “Older Black Lives Matter—Says Top Researcher.”

MLive mentioned the Institute for Social Research in “Increasing Michigan’s renewable energy portfolio is a no-risk strategy customers would embrace.”

Monitoring the Future was mentioned and Lloyd Johnston was quoted by The Detroit News in “Legalize pot, 56% in Mich. poll say.”

Eight outlets, including The Washington Post, mentioned Carolyn Yoon in “Black like her: Is racial identity a state of mind?

WDET interviewed Arline Geronimus in “How Does Poverty Lower Life Expectancy?

David Lam is featured by Crain’s Detroit Business in “UM names new director of Institute for Social Research.”

MLive mentioned William Axinn in “U-M to release findings of ‘campus climate’ sexual assault survey.”

Richard Curtin was mentioned by dbusiness in “Consumers Voice Largest Increase in Economic Optimism Since 2004.”

Lloyd Johnston and Richard Miech

Lloyd Johnston and Richard MiechMore teens are smoking electronic cigarettes than traditional cigarettes, according to the latest Monitoring the Future survey. The survey, released at a D.C. press conference in mid-December, received widespread news coverage, with articles by the Associated Press and others appearing in the International Business Times, NBC News, Bloomberg Businessweek, the Global Post and many other print, broadcast and online media around the world. ISR researchers Lloyd Johnston and Richard Miech also reported that marijuana use by teens appeared to level off, despite legalization of that drug in several states in 2014. Binge drinking and abuse of prescription painkillers also dropped. Read more about the latest Monitoring the Future findings and watch videos on the findings at http://bit.ly/MTF-1 and http://bit.ly/MTF-2.

Richard Curtin

Richard CurtinConsumer confidence reached the highest point in eight years in December, according to ISR economist Richard Curtin, who directs the U-M Surveys of Consumers, now sponsored by Bloomberg. The good economic news from the Surveys, reported in late December, spurred major news coverage by NPR, The New York Times, U.S. News & World Report and other media in the U.S. and around the world. “Consumers have much to be thankful for in this holiday season: renewed job growth, larger anticipated wage gains, and the steep decline in gasoline prices,” said Curtin. “Importantly, rather than basing their renewed optimism on volatile oil prices, consumers have become convinced that growing strength in the national economy will result in continued gains in jobs and wages during the year ahead. Learn more: http://bit.ly/UM-surveys.

Vicki Freedman

Vicki FreedmanNo matter where they may live, older adults with limitations are likely to have unmet needs for help with daily living and personal care, according to a study by ISR researcher Vicki Freedman and Brenda Spillman of the Urban Institute. But according to Freedman, some needs, like those related to grocery shopping, laundry, and making hot meals, are more likely to go unmet for those in retirement or senior housing communities. The study, funded by the National Institute on Aging, highlighted research findings from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS), based on data from more than 8,000 Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older. The findings were covered by a number of news media, including The New York Times “New Old Age” blog, written by journalist Paula Span.

Helen Levy and Kenneth Langa

Helen Levy and Kenneth LangaThe Internet has evolved into a potent tool for providing information on health. But according to a recent study featured Nov. 14 in Medical News Today, elderly Americans who are rarely or never online may be left at a disadvantage as different kinds of medical information migrate to the Internet. A study by ISR researchers Helen Levy and Kenneth Langa found that of Americans aged 65 and over, those with low health literacy were also the least likely to use the Internet. When they did go online, they generally didn’t use the computer to look up health information. Levy and colleagues analyzed data from 1,400 participants in the 2009 and 2010 Health and Retirement Study. Almost 32 percent of participants with good health literacy got health information from the Internet, in contrast with fewer than 10 percent of those with low health literacy. The findings suggest that other ways should be found to boost health literacy among the elderly, Levy said.

Pamela Smock

Pamela SmockThe American family is changing, and the biggest change is the number of women having babies outside marriage. That’s what ISR researcher Pamela Smock told Michigan Radio’s Cynthia Canty in a Nov. 18 interview on Stateside. Once the sexual revolution removed the stigma attached to premarital sex, new family structures began to emerge. Now more than 40 percent of births occur outside marriage, Smock told Canty, and a majority of those are born to cohabiting couples. “The connection between childbearing and marriage… sort of got decoupled, so people were more accepting of different kinds of family formation patterns,” Smock said. Some 70 percent of people who get married live together first, she said, and that figure is likely to rise to 80 percent, with only those with strict religious convictions not cohabiting. Smock’s research appeared in an article on the evolving American family featured in ISR’s Sampler newsletter and in Michigan Today.