Society 2030 presents graduate student competition awards

 

Society 2030 steering committee members Wayne R. McCullough (left) and Toni C. Antonucci (right) present the award to Stephanie M. Carpenter and David M. K. Knapp (center). Photo by Eva Menezes.

Society 2030 steering committee members Wayne R. McCullough (left) and Toni C. Antonucci (right) present the award to Stephanie M. Carpenter and David M. K. Knapp (center) during a Society 2030 meeting on March 19. Click image for larger view. Photo by Eva Menezes.

David M. K. Knapp, a doctoral student in Economics, and Stephanie M. Carpenter, a joint doctoral student in Marketing and Social Psychology, have won the first annual Society 2030 Graduate Student Competition. The competition awards projects that address and offer solutions to problems facing society in 2030.

Knapp won first place for his project “A Nudge to Improve Retirement Planning Through Social Security.” Carpenter won second place for “The Positive Consequences of Diminished Inhibitory Control Across the Consumer Lifespan.” Learn more about the winning projects on the Society 2030 website.

The Society 2030 Consortium brings together U-M researchers and corporate leaders to prepare for society’s changing demographic reality.

U-M’s Toni Antonucci to receive Distinguished Career Award

Toni AntonucciANN ARBOR, Mich.—University of Michigan psychologist Toni Antonucci will receive the 2012 Distinguished Career Contribution to Gerontology Award from The Gerontological Society of America, the nation’s largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging.

Antonucci is the associate vice president for research, social sciences and humanities, at U-M, the Elizabeth M. Douvan Collegiate Professor of Psychology, and a research professor at the U-M Institute for Social Research (ISR).  She also chairs Society 2030, an innovative consortium bringing together U-M researchers and corporate leaders to prepare for society’s changing age structure. Continue reading

‘Monitoring the Future’ receives $35 million to continue for another five years

Monitoring the Future logo“Monitoring the Future,” one of the largest and longest-running studies of American youth, as well as of college students and young adults, will receive a $35 million award to continue for another five years.

Monitoring the Future: A Continuing Study of the Lifestyles and Values of American Youth” (MTF) began 37 years ago with funding from the White House and the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), and it has received continuation funding from NIDA (one of the National Institutes of Health) since then. The project is conducted annually at the U-M Institute for Social Research (ISR). Continue reading