Society 2030 presents graduate student competition awards

 

Society 2030 steering committee members Wayne R. McCullough (left) and Toni C. Antonucci (right) present the award to Stephanie M. Carpenter and David M. K. Knapp (center). Photo by Eva Menezes.

Society 2030 steering committee members Wayne R. McCullough (left) and Toni C. Antonucci (right) present the award to Stephanie M. Carpenter and David M. K. Knapp (center) during a Society 2030 meeting on March 19. Click image for larger view. Photo by Eva Menezes.

David M. K. Knapp, a doctoral student in Economics, and Stephanie M. Carpenter, a joint doctoral student in Marketing and Social Psychology, have won the first annual Society 2030 Graduate Student Competition. The competition awards projects that address and offer solutions to problems facing society in 2030.

Knapp won first place for his project “A Nudge to Improve Retirement Planning Through Social Security.” Carpenter won second place for “The Positive Consequences of Diminished Inhibitory Control Across the Consumer Lifespan.” Learn more about the winning projects on the Society 2030 website.

The Society 2030 Consortium brings together U-M researchers and corporate leaders to prepare for society’s changing demographic reality.

Latest disability trends: Oldest old improving but Boomers doing worse

Elderly man in wheelchair

Photo by Thinkstock.

ANN ARBOR, Mich.—The oldest old are doing better and those approaching late life are doing worse.  But Americans between the ages of 65 and 84 are experiencing about the same level of disabilities as they did at the start of the 21st century.  Those are the key findings a new study of trends in late-life activity limitations that harmonizes the findings of five independent national surveys of more than 40,000 Americans.

The study, funded by the National Institute on Aging, was published online today by the peer-reviewed journal DemographyConducted by a team of researchers from several U.S. universities and think tanks, the study is the most comprehensive analysis to date of how well older Americans are able to carry out daily living tasks independently. Continue reading

$2.7 million U-M, WSU grant aims to improve African American health

ANN ARBOR, Mich.—The University of Michigan Institute for Social Research (ISR) and the Wayne State University Institute of Gerontology have won a $2.7 million grant renewal from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to continue the work of the Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging Research through 2017.

The Michigan Center is one of only seven across the country established to improve the health of older minorities through education, scholarship and outreach. Continue reading

U-M’s Toni Antonucci to receive Distinguished Career Award

Toni AntonucciANN ARBOR, Mich.—University of Michigan psychologist Toni Antonucci will receive the 2012 Distinguished Career Contribution to Gerontology Award from The Gerontological Society of America, the nation’s largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging.

Antonucci is the associate vice president for research, social sciences and humanities, at U-M, the Elizabeth M. Douvan Collegiate Professor of Psychology, and a research professor at the U-M Institute for Social Research (ISR).  She also chairs Society 2030, an innovative consortium bringing together U-M researchers and corporate leaders to prepare for society’s changing age structure. Continue reading